The Fractured Future of Browser Privacy


The Fractured Future of Browser Privacy

Better anti-tracking measures have become the norm for Chrome, Firefox, Safari, and other modern browsers. But they still disagree on how exactly they should work.

In the 1990s, web browsers like Netscape Navigator and Microsoft Internet Explorer competed bitterly to offer the snazziest new features and attract users. Today, the browser landscape looks totally different. For one thing, Chrome now dominates, controlling around two-thirds of the market on both desktop and mobile. Even more radical, though, is the recent competitive focus on privacy, a welcome change for anyone who’s gotten sick of creepy ad tracking and data mismanagement. But as browser increasingly diverge in their approaches, it’s clear that not all privacy protections are created equal.

At the USENIX Enigma security conference in San Francisco this week, developers, security researchers, and privacy advocates presented differing views of how browsers should protect their users against data abuses. In a panel discussion that included representatives from Mozilla Firefox, Google Chrome, Microsoft Edge, and Brave, all participants agreed that collaboration across the industry has driven innovation and helped make privacy a priority. But some browsers are taking a hardline approach, while others prefer to increase protections within the status quo.





Like it? Share with your friends!

What's Your Reaction?

Angry Angry
0
Angry
Confused Confused
0
Confused
Buffoon Buffoon
0
Buffoon
Cry Cry
0
Cry
Cute Cute
0
Cute
WOW WOW
0
WOW
Dislike Dislike
0
Dislike
Fail Fail
0
Fail
Geek Geek
0
Geek
Like Like
0
Like

Send this to a friend